• Monster Man

    By Pat Mundus
    Photography by Pat Mundus Collection

    THE LATE FRANK MUNDUS BECAME FAMOUS AS THE MODEL FOR QUINT, THE TOUGH-AS-NAIL SEA CAPTAIN IN JAWS. BUT DID HE BEAR A RESEMBLANCE TO HIS FICTIONAL ALTER EGO?

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  • Stranger Montauk

    By Nina Channing
    Photography by East Hampton Star Archive
    How did the hit Netflix show "Stranger Things" take its cues from the real-world legends of Montauk?
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  • Ghosts of Sylvester Manor

    By Philippe Cheng
    Photography by Philippe Cheng
    The old plantation on Shelter Island, once home to slaves and slave-owners, is a place where voices from American history echo through stairwells and attics, and the fragrance of the past grows th
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  • The Player

    By Ellen T. White
    Photography by Durell Godfrey

    Back in the 1980s, the tale of the so-called "Maidstone Con Man" captured imaginations well beyond the fairways of the storied club.

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  • Prodigal Father

    By Christopher Walsh
    Photography by Ken Walsh

    Rolled up and stored in a mailing tube, lying for decades in a New England attic, the canvas had collapsed onto itself at one end. There was water damage, too, effectively gluing together two sections of the roll. When it was finally stretched out, the paint had pulled off both sides, leaving foot-long white scars.

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  • Summer of Sam

    By Taylor Vecsey
    Photography by East Hampton Star

    Forty years ago this summer, two and a half hours west of here, a heat wave brought an already intense summer to a boil. New York City, litter-strewn and struggling, had declared bankruptcy. The blackout of 1977, lasting 25 hours and hitting most of the city, led to looting and torched storefronts. The Yankees were battling their way out of the blighted Bronx to win a championship. It was the summer Star Wars lit up the screen. It was the summer of Sam. 

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  • Trump Was Here

    By Nina Channing
    Photography by Doug Kuntz

    The Trump name is everywhere, on steaks, on schools, on beautiful chocolate cakes, on White House stationery, on hotels from Aspen to Azerbaijan. So why is the Trump name not in the Hamptons?

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  • by Patricia Marx · Oct. 10, 2016
    Photography by

    CONGRATULATE ME. I DID IT! I broke up with Jimmy. . . . Last night after the Bartoshucks’ dinner party. . . . They served risotto. But did you hear me? I said I broke up with Jimmy. Promise you won’t say anything to him. He thinks we’re still good. . . . No. No, I could never tell him. You know how I hate confrontation.

  • by Carissa Katz · Oct. 10, 2016
    Photography by

    Looking north at a certain angle from the cluster of barns at the corner of Cooks Lane and Scuttlehole Road, the stretch of cultivated fields offers a glimpse into another era, when eastern Long Island was a promising new frontier for farmers squeezed off their acreage farther west on the Island by the forward march of development.

  • by Colleen DeBaise · Oct. 10, 2016
    Photography by

    Thirty-five years in the restaurant business have honed David Loewenberg’s instincts. But he’s also got a preternatural calm that stands out in a high-intensity industry known for its nerve-fraying chaos and amped-up kitchen staff.

  • Until a few years ago, nobody was spearing pelagic (that is to say, deep-ocean) fish in the Atlantic off Montauk. But persistence has paid off. Searching around little-known man-made structures in the ocean three hours from the dock, Correale and his friends have confounded other anglers by spearing 100 to 200-pound fish.
    by Levi Shaw-Faber · Oct. 10, 2016
    Photography by

    Until a few years ago, nobody was spearing pelagic (that is to say, deep-ocean) fish in the Atlantic off Montauk. But persistence has paid off. Searching around little-known man-made structures in the ocean three hours from the dock, Correale and his friends have confounded other anglers by spearing 100 to 200-pound fish.

  • by Glyn Vincent · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by Michael Halsband

    Decades have passed since the first Latino immigrants arrived on the East End. Hard-working people from places like Ecuador, Colombia, and Mexico, they are today woven into the fabric of life here — building businesses, volunteering, raising children ready to make their mark on the future of this country. Five voices from the community speak of becoming American — sharing glimpses of both the hardships and the everyday heroism of that difficult path.

  • by Laura Donnelly · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by John Musnicki

    Bored with your basic barbecue? Consider un Asado, estilo Argentino. Laura Donnelly digs in to tenderly grilled beef and open-fire-roasted lamb. Pass the chimichurri sauce

  • by Laura Donnelly · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by Lena Yaremenko

    “Kraut Kween” Nadia Ernestus of Hamptons Brine makes wholesome and probiotic kvass and sauerkraut that have become so popular she could found a business empire. Instead, she’s keeping it humble.

  • by Carissa Katz · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by Carissa Katz and Wesnofske Family Photos

    With its open vistas of brown furrows, then low green plants dotted with white flowers running in parallel lines to the horizon, Bridgehampton used to be famous not for movie stars and mansions, but for potatoes. Today, the Wesnofske clan holds on against all odds: a squeeze on farmable land, the increasing difficulty of getting to market, and the deeper question of who will carry on.

  • by Carissa Katz · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by Homer Parkes

    The story of how your tilapia ended up swimming in basil and wine on your dinner plate is probably a more convoluted journey than Finding Dory’s. But, as the concept of buying local expands to embrace seafood, it doesn’t have to be that way. On an express trip from the ocean off Montauk Point to Nick and Toni’s, Carissa Katz traces a few pounds of premium black sea bass.

  • by Laura Donnelly · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by Phillip Cheng

    The saga of the rise and fall and rise again of the woman behind Tate’s Cookie’s, Kathleen King, borders on Shakespearean. At the very least, King laughingly says, it could be a “made for TV movie.” Laura Donnelly reports.

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