• The Big Chill

    By David Gibbons
    Photography by Edward Patrowicz

    THE WORLD KNOWS ALL ABOUT MONTAUK IN MIDSUMMER. BUT THE PLEASURES OF A RESPITE AT GURNEY’S IN THE FROZEN MONTHS? THAT’S A SECRET WE’RE ALMOST RELUCTANT TO SHARE.

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  • Brave

    By Nina Channing
    Photography by Howard Kanovitz

    There is a place to the east where the highway falls into the ocean. It is where dry pavement gives way to briny waters, more like a wide sand bar than a true peninsula.

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  • True Oyster Cult

    By Biddle Duke
    Photography by Biddle Duke • Paintings by Nadine Robbins
    A brief history of New Yorkers’ love affair with our favorite native bivalve—and an eater's guide to the very best from Eastern Long Island and the Sound.
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  • Green Monster

    By Lang Phipps
    Photography by Michael Light
    A LAVISH EXPANSE OF LAWN IS THE ULTIMATE EXPRESSION OF AMERICAN WELL-BEING AND WEALTH. BUT HOW DID THAT BECOME THE FASHION? AND AT WHAT COST?   
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  • The Bird Man of Gardiner's Island

    By Glyn Vincent
    Photography by Dell Cullum
    HOW CITIZEN SCIENTISTS — WORKING RIGHT HERE ON GARDINER’S ISLAND — SAVED THE OSPREY IS A STORY THAT ALL CONCERNED ABOUT ATTACKS ON THE ENVI
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  • The Babysitter Mystery

    By Taylor Vecsey
    Photography by Various Sources
    IN 1955, A 14-YEAR-OLD BABYSITTER WAS ABDUCTED FROM A SUMMER HOUSE AND ATTACKED BY A MASKED STRANGER.
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  • Happy Campers

    By Nina Channing
    Photography by Edward Patrowicz
    THE MONTAUK SHORES TRAILER PARK IS A HOLDOUT FROM A SIMPLER ERA, BUT OUTSIDE FORCES OF CHANGE — MILLIONAIRES-ONLY REAL ESTATE PRICES, FEMA’
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  • Getting To Know You

    By Alec Baldwin
    Photography by Getty

    THESE ARE A FEW OF ALEC BALDWIN’S FAVORITE THINGS ABOUT JULIE ANDREWS: SHE’S STRONG, SHE HAS INTEGRITY, SHE’S GODDAMN FUNNY, AND, OF COURSE, THAT VOICE.

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  • The Player

    By Ellen T. White
    Photography by Durell Godfrey

    Back in the 1980s, the tale of the so-called "Maidstone Con Man" captured imaginations well beyond the fairways of the storied club.

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  • Prodigal Father

    By Christopher Walsh
    Photography by Ken Walsh

    Rolled up and stored in a mailing tube, lying for decades in a New England attic, the canvas had collapsed onto itself at one end. There was water damage, too, effectively gluing together two sections of the roll. When it was finally stretched out, the paint had pulled off both sides, leaving foot-long white scars.

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  • Summer of Sam

    By Taylor Vecsey
    Photography by East Hampton Star

    Forty years ago this summer, two and a half hours west of here, a heat wave brought an already intense summer to a boil. New York City, litter-strewn and struggling, had declared bankruptcy. The blackout of 1977, lasting 25 hours and hitting most of the city, led to looting and torched storefronts. The Yankees were battling their way out of the blighted Bronx to win a championship. It was the summer Star Wars lit up the screen. It was the summer of Sam. 

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  • Trump Was Here

    By Nina Channing
    Photography by Doug Kuntz

    The Trump name is everywhere, on steaks, on schools, on beautiful chocolate cakes, on White House stationery, on hotels from Aspen to Azerbaijan. So why is the Trump name not in the Hamptons?

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  • Until a few years ago, nobody was spearing pelagic (that is to say, deep-ocean) fish in the Atlantic off Montauk. But persistence has paid off. Searching around little-known man-made structures in the ocean three hours from the dock, Correale and his friends have confounded other anglers by spearing 100 to 200-pound fish.
    by Levi Shaw-Faber · Oct. 10, 2016
    Photography by

    Until a few years ago, nobody was spearing pelagic (that is to say, deep-ocean) fish in the Atlantic off Montauk. But persistence has paid off. Searching around little-known man-made structures in the ocean three hours from the dock, Correale and his friends have confounded other anglers by spearing 100 to 200-pound fish.

  • by Glyn Vincent · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by Michael Halsband

    Decades have passed since the first Latino immigrants arrived on the East End. Hard-working people from places like Ecuador, Colombia, and Mexico, they are today woven into the fabric of life here — building businesses, volunteering, raising children ready to make their mark on the future of this country. Five voices from the community speak of becoming American — sharing glimpses of both the hardships and the everyday heroism of that difficult path.

  • by Christine Sampson · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by doug kuntz

    For decades, the ideal garden and the pristine-green lawn has come at a steep price: chemicals that poison the land and water (and, sometimes, even people). But today, as Christine Sampson reports, there are alternatives — and they are beautiful, because pure nature is perfect.

  • by Irene Silverman · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by regina cherry, Russelll drumm

    A story about Stuart and Susanne — a legendary bayman from Bonac and a shrink from Berlin who forged a rare friendship, a bond of mutual respect that lasts even after their deaths.

  • by Laura Donnelly · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by Homer Parkes

    It’s a cherished family ritual that harkens back to calmer summer days gone by: the casual but delectable feasts for 10 to 20 cooked up by Tom Scheerer, the renowned interior designer

  • by Michael Shnayerson · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by PICKENS FAMILY COLLECTION

    Sag Harbor's African-American beachfront communities share a rich history, dating back nearly 200 years to the dawn of the whaling era. Now, their unassuming homes are being razed and replaced by a developer and his wealthy client, one of New York's biggest investment managers. As the pace of change quickens, long-time residents fear their sanctuary is in danger of losing its soul.

  • by Laura Donnelly · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by Phillip Cheng

    The saga of the rise and fall and rise again of the woman behind Tate’s Cookie’s, Kathleen King, borders on Shakespearean. At the very least, King laughingly says, it could be a “made for TV movie.” Laura Donnelly reports.

  • by Amanda M. Fairbanks · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by Durell Godfrey

    Joe and Liza’s ice cream is fast becoming the South Fork’s favorite.

  • by Laura Donnelly · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by Lena Yaremenko

    “Kraut Kween” Nadia Ernestus of Hamptons Brine makes wholesome and probiotic kvass and sauerkraut that have become so popular she could found a business empire. Instead, she’s keeping it humble.

  • by Laura Donnelly · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by John Musnicki

    Bored with your basic barbecue? Consider un Asado, estilo Argentino. Laura Donnelly digs in to tenderly grilled beef and open-fire-roasted lamb. Pass the chimichurri sauce

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