• Voice of The Storm

    By Nina Channing
    Photography by East Hampton Star Archive

    Survivors of the Hurricane of 1938 recall the wind's haunting harmonic scream, the houses destroyed, the lives lost. 

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  • Trouble on the Half Shell

    By Biddle Duke
    Photography by Various Sources

    Oyster farming is a wonderful thing—for the environment, for foodies, for small-scale entrepreneurs.

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  • Fantasy Island

    By Zinnia Smith
    Photography by East Hampton Star

    NAZI SCIENTISTS? WEAPONIZED LYME DISEASE? CREEPY EXPERIMENTS IN GENETIC MUTATION? NO.

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  • Let's Rock

    By editor
    Photography by Nina Channing

    SUSAN NIELAND SELLS FLOTSAM-AND-JETSAM JEWELRY BY THE SEASHORE

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  • The Beatnik Drug Bust of '65

    By Christopher Walsh
    Photography by East Hampton Star Archive

    “It was the social event of the 1965 season, no doubt about it,” was the rather sarcastic opening line in The East Hampton Star’s Aug. 26 issue.

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  • by Biddle Duke · Nov. 11, 2016
    Photography by James Katsipis

    Evelyn O’Doherty is that lonely figure you pass on your way to work: She’s going the other way with boards piled on her roof, and you wonder, “What could she possibly be up to?”

  • by Laura Donnelly · Nov. 11, 2016
    Photography by

    Bluefish: one of the most delicious, underrated, and overlooked fish in our waters. You will not find them featured on any local restaurant’s menu, no matter how local or “dock to dish” they claim to be.

  • by Levi Shaw-Faber · Nov. 11, 2016
    Photography by Philippe Cheng

    Tiina the store in Amagansett is so cool that you might think you're in one of those pop-ups that arrive in late spring and are empty before the leaves start changing - but you only feel that way until you meet Tiina Laakkonen herself.

  • by Carl Safina · Nov. 11, 2016
    Photography by Patricia Paladines, Carl Safina

    This daily morning walk is how I take the pulse of the place, and my own. The daily miraculous seldom gets attention. We are too busy, insecure, and - mainly - blind to the exquisite.

  • by Carissa Katz · Nov. 11, 2016
    Photography by

    The Dock to Dish mission, at its most basic level, was to connect consumers more directly with small-scale commercial fishermen who practice sustainable catch methods.

  • by Laura Donnelly · Oct. 10, 2016
    Photography by

    The holidays are bubbly season, and Long Island winemakers give us every reason to drink their sparkling wines. They really are delicious and reasonably priced. Look for some of these North and South Fork sparklers.

  • by Patricia Marx · Oct. 10, 2016
    Photography by

    CONGRATULATE ME. I DID IT! I broke up with Jimmy. . . . Last night after the Bartoshucks’ dinner party. . . . They served risotto. But did you hear me? I said I broke up with Jimmy. Promise you won’t say anything to him. He thinks we’re still good. . . . No. No, I could never tell him. You know how I hate confrontation.

  • by Carissa Katz · Oct. 10, 2016
    Photography by

    Looking north at a certain angle from the cluster of barns at the corner of Cooks Lane and Scuttlehole Road, the stretch of cultivated fields offers a glimpse into another era, when eastern Long Island was a promising new frontier for farmers squeezed off their acreage farther west on the Island by the forward march of development.

  • by Colleen DeBaise · Oct. 10, 2016
    Photography by

    Thirty-five years in the restaurant business have honed David Loewenberg’s instincts. But he’s also got a preternatural calm that stands out in a high-intensity industry known for its nerve-fraying chaos and amped-up kitchen staff.

  • Until a few years ago, nobody was spearing pelagic (that is to say, deep-ocean) fish in the Atlantic off Montauk. But persistence has paid off. Searching around little-known man-made structures in the ocean three hours from the dock, Correale and his friends have confounded other anglers by spearing 100 to 200-pound fish.
    by Levi Shaw-Faber · Oct. 10, 2016
    Photography by

    Until a few years ago, nobody was spearing pelagic (that is to say, deep-ocean) fish in the Atlantic off Montauk. But persistence has paid off. Searching around little-known man-made structures in the ocean three hours from the dock, Correale and his friends have confounded other anglers by spearing 100 to 200-pound fish.

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