• Last Speaker of Bonac

    By Cornelia Channing
    Photography by Doug Kuntz

    Does anyone still speak the ancient dialect of Springs and Amagansett?

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  • I Want to Be Alone

    By Augie Schultz
    Photography by

    In honor of August's Escapism Issue, here are six very specific places to sneak off to when the August crowds are working your last nerv

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  • Ayahuasca Moms

    By Sophie Griffin
    Photography by Erin Houghtaling
    As psychedelics gain scientific traction for their healing properties, enthusiasts are diving into enlightenment at weekend retreats by
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  • Up, Up, & Away

    By Erica-Lynn Huberty
    Photography by The Collection of Jeremy Cole

    Recalling the romance and tragedy of the Free Life balloon.

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  • My Life in A Cult

    By Spencer L. Schneider
    Photography by Tycho Burwell
    For 23 years, he says, he was trapped in an ultra-shadowy group that stole from him his dignity, his youth, and his psychological freedom.
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  • The Secret Story of a Seafaring Citizen Spy

    By Glyn Vincent
    Photography by Various Sources

    The British fleet was anchored near Gardiner’s Island, when a modest merchant from New London — one of the unheralded heroes who plied the Sound in small boa

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  • by Carissa Katz · Nov. 11, 2016
    Photography by

    The Dock to Dish mission, at its most basic level, was to connect consumers more directly with small-scale commercial fishermen who practice sustainable catch methods.

  • by Laura Donnelly · Oct. 10, 2016
    Photography by

    The holidays are bubbly season, and Long Island winemakers give us every reason to drink their sparkling wines. They really are delicious and reasonably priced. Look for some of these North and South Fork sparklers.

  • by Patricia Marx · Oct. 10, 2016
    Photography by

    CONGRATULATE ME. I DID IT! I broke up with Jimmy. . . . Last night after the Bartoshucks’ dinner party. . . . They served risotto. But did you hear me? I said I broke up with Jimmy. Promise you won’t say anything to him. He thinks we’re still good. . . . No. No, I could never tell him. You know how I hate confrontation.

  • by Carissa Katz · Oct. 10, 2016
    Photography by

    Looking north at a certain angle from the cluster of barns at the corner of Cooks Lane and Scuttlehole Road, the stretch of cultivated fields offers a glimpse into another era, when eastern Long Island was a promising new frontier for farmers squeezed off their acreage farther west on the Island by the forward march of development.

  • by Colleen DeBaise · Oct. 10, 2016
    Photography by

    Thirty-five years in the restaurant business have honed David Loewenberg’s instincts. But he’s also got a preternatural calm that stands out in a high-intensity industry known for its nerve-fraying chaos and amped-up kitchen staff.

  • Until a few years ago, nobody was spearing pelagic (that is to say, deep-ocean) fish in the Atlantic off Montauk. But persistence has paid off. Searching around little-known man-made structures in the ocean three hours from the dock, Correale and his friends have confounded other anglers by spearing 100 to 200-pound fish.
    by Levi Shaw-Faber · Oct. 10, 2016
    Photography by

    Until a few years ago, nobody was spearing pelagic (that is to say, deep-ocean) fish in the Atlantic off Montauk. But persistence has paid off. Searching around little-known man-made structures in the ocean three hours from the dock, Correale and his friends have confounded other anglers by spearing 100 to 200-pound fish.

  • by Glyn Vincent · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by Michael Halsband

    Decades have passed since the first Latino immigrants arrived on the East End. Hard-working people from places like Ecuador, Colombia, and Mexico, they are today woven into the fabric of life here — building businesses, volunteering, raising children ready to make their mark on the future of this country. Five voices from the community speak of becoming American — sharing glimpses of both the hardships and the everyday heroism of that difficult path.

  • by Carissa Katz · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by Homer Parkes

    The story of how your tilapia ended up swimming in basil and wine on your dinner plate is probably a more convoluted journey than Finding Dory’s. But, as the concept of buying local expands to embrace seafood, it doesn’t have to be that way. On an express trip from the ocean off Montauk Point to Nick and Toni’s, Carissa Katz traces a few pounds of premium black sea bass.

  • by Carissa Katz · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by Carissa Katz and Wesnofske Family Photos

    With its open vistas of brown furrows, then low green plants dotted with white flowers running in parallel lines to the horizon, Bridgehampton used to be famous not for movie stars and mansions, but for potatoes. Today, the Wesnofske clan holds on against all odds: a squeeze on farmable land, the increasing difficulty of getting to market, and the deeper question of who will carry on.

  • by Christine Sampson · Sep. 9, 2016
    Photography by doug kuntz

    For decades, the ideal garden and the pristine-green lawn has come at a steep price: chemicals that poison the land and water (and, sometimes, even people). But today, as Christine Sampson reports, there are alternatives — and they are beautiful, because pure nature is perfect.

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