With darkness descending by 4 p.m., it’s time to hole up to write the Great American Novel, knit the Great American Sweater, or, um, secretly watch a ton of TV and movies with a “Hamptons” theme. Here are our picks that are either timeless, essential watching, or just so hysterically, obnoxious that we can’t look away.

Bee-Lieve

Bridgehampton is home to a sports team whose feel-good winning streaks are unrivaled anywhere outside the realm of Hollywood fiction — and now, with a documentary movie in the works, the world is about to hear the buzz.

Lawn Envy

For decades, the ideal garden and the pristine-green lawn has come at a steep price: chemicals that poison the land and water (and, sometimes, even people). But today, as Christine Sampson reports, there are alternatives — and they are beautiful, because pure nature is perfect.

Catch & Release

A story about Stuart and Susanne — a legendary bayman from Bonac and a shrink from Berlin who forged a rare friendship, a bond of mutual respect that lasts even after their deaths.

Summer Kids

For a century, the South Fork has drawn them. Lifelong friendships have been made, beach-marshmallow traditions established, and countless love affairs begun with this preternaturally stunning stretch of sand and fertile earth. As Christina Robert — a filmmaker, novelist, and environmental activist — writes, growing up a summer kid has also sprouted something else entirely: roots and the inspiration for a big life.

Good Vibrations

Like the California pop of 1960s and ’70s, the sound of Jack and Eliza is as warm and irresistibly bittersweet as the last day of summer vacation.

It was 1973, the year Michael Shnayerson lived at the windmill at Quail Hill. He pretended successfully to be a tennis pro and unsuccessfully to be Kurt Vonnegut, and surprised even himself by defeating Geraldo Rivera on the court. Those long-ago memories of teenaged freedom were rekindledrecently, when he read a real-estate ad. . . .

Nice Legs

Technically, they were told to walk, but Sag Harbor’s Legs ain’t walking anywhere. And why should they?

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